Monday, October 17, 2016

NEW: fridur mini angels - behind the scenes

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pattern design fridur angels, paper angels, design process

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My new Fridur mini angels were not designed and produced in a heart beat. Don't know if it's interesting for anyone, but I just thought it's fun to share the usually hidden designing process behind this product.

1. From a vague ‘something in the air’ feeling I start creating a visual world with a coherent style... in short: a mood board (see first image above). This mood board is my source and help during the design process. When the product is ready it should fit perfectly in the world I created in the mood collage.

For Fridur I chose for: cosy, stylish, crafty, warm, hip, winter, graphic, sweet and natural. My major tool for making mood boards is Pinterest.

2. Then I google for catchy and matching product names, mostly in Northern European languages. I found Fridur in Icelandic and it means Peace!

3. When my mood board is ready, I look at the dominant colors and make a color scheme with it.

4. I start designing lots and lots of prints in Illustrator, I select the ones I like best and look for the best pattern combinations. See above.

5. Then I start combining the prints into my product. I print, cut, and fold - I make about 50 angels or more - and at the end I decide which ones are going to make it to the printer. 

6. What happens next is not as interesting, but still necessary (and very time consuming!): I need to design a package, I finalize the technical print files, I design the cutting files, I guide the printing process, order corn bags, make packing instructions for the packaging company, calculate a prize, put everything in the JM administration and see to it that the angels end up in my warehouse.

7. And then of course we need photos of the new product. First I make a photography storyboard, a list of scenes I need/want to shoot. And then I go shopping for the right props with my moodboard in my hand. At home I go online shopping for clothes for my model.

8. On the photoshoot day I mostly shoot 3 products at once. The shoot with my model takes about 4 to 5 hours and the rest of the day I spend taking pack shots and close-ups.

9.After selecting and editing the photo's and uploading them to my catalog and my website I can finally say: hurray, my product is ready!

Photo-credits mood board:

Greeting card: Jonathan Adler
Girl with ochre cardigan, photography: Ross Trevail
Ginger bread house: Martha Stewart
Mistletoe: Trendland

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